AskNadia: Scared to Fly Airplanes After My Glaucoma Surgery

Dear Nadia, I am a type 2 diabetic with glaucoma from my diabetes. My Doctor tells me it is OK to fly on airplanes after my surgery. But, I am scared something might happen. Beth Dear Beth, Being diagnosed with glaucoma means that the fluids in your eyes were not draining properly which could be a result of high blood sugars. People with diabetes are

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Diabetes Elevates Risk Of Glaucoma

People with diabetes – especially those who have had the disease for a long period of time – are at a higher risk of developing glaucoma, according to the results of a new study. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University in Maryland looked at data from just under 3 million patients in 16 countries to determine the relationship between diabetes and glaucoma. According to the data,

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Eye Drug’s Success With Diabetic Macular Degeneration

A drug traditionally used to treat age-related macular degeneration has been successful in also treating diabetic macular edema in recent trials. According to Bayer, which co-developed the drug along with Regeneron, the drug VEGF Trap-Eye, also known as Eylea, has reached goals established by the companies during year-long, Phase 3 trials. Diabetic macular edema, which impacts about 10 percent of those with diabetes, leads to

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How High Is Your Eye Q?

The eyes are the windows to the soul, and also one of the primary places where health problems associated with diabetes turn up. Because high blood sugar can cause a host of problems, people with diabetes are especially at risk for problems including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts In fact, according to webMD.com, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness among adults age 20 to

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For People With Diabetes, Contacts With a Twist

Technology now under development would allow people with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar through their contact lenses. Researcher Babak Parviz of the University of Washington in Seattle invented the lenses, which monitor the amount of glucose in tear fluid. That fluid tracks blood glucose levels closely, and Parviz hopes to have the lenses communicate wirelessly with some sort of auxiliary meter. Parviz and fellow

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