Tips for Wearing Medical ID

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Wearing medical identification can provide emergencymedical workers with potentially life-savinginformation if you are in an accident or endup in an emergency room.

Sometimes, however, people with diabetes view wearingsuch ID as an onerous chore. But this needn’t be so.

Wearing medical ID can be pleasurable and even fun.

Keep these considerations in mind when choosing medicalID jewelry:

Decide which style you want

Many companies now offer trendy, fashionable bracelets orother jewelry that can include precious stones, mixtures ofsilver and gold, and even beads.

If you prefer a more conservative style, you can choose atraditional ID bracelet that can be engraved with informationabout your medical condition.

Have reasonable expectations about your medical ID jewelry

Diamonds might last forever, but your medical ID mightnot. If you wear it every day, it will eventually need somemaintenance, such as re-engraving, reinforcing the attachmentof the plate to the chain, and re-enameling coloredareas.

The more the merrier!

Think about changing your medical ID daily or weekly tomatch what you are wearing. It will look more stylish andmay last longer.

Be creative

Gone are the days when your choices were limited. Now youcan even purchase “do-it-yourself” kits that allow you tomake the kind of bracelet you want.

Understand the value of what you are buying

Items that are trendy have a shorter life span than itemsmade of gold. And price has a lot to do with longevity. Besure you understand that the purpose of your investment isto save your life and that it may require a financial commitmentand occasional updating.

Susan Eisen is president of Lifetag Inc. She has had type 1diabetes for the past 11 years. For more information, e-mailLifetag.com or phone (888) 543-3824.

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