Preventing Type 2

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Early recognition and lifestyleinterventions are vitally importantif we are to make progress in theprevention of type 2 diabetes inpeople of all ages.

The statistics are disheartening.Of the more than 18 millionpeople in the United States withdiabetes, more than 5 million areundiagnosed. This population isalready at risk for developing silentcomplications relating to high bloodglucose.

The statistics for metabolicsyndrome (a risk factor for diabetesand cardiovascular disease) are evenworse. According to the AmericanHeart Association (AHA) Web site,statistics compiled during 1988–1994estimate that about 47 million U.S.residents have metabolic syndrome.Not only are these numbers out ofdate, the AHA admits that even thisinformation is limited. Additionally,the number of children and teenswith metabolic syndrome is rapidlyincreasing, although the actualnumbers are unknown.

What can you do to identify yourrisks and have a meaningfuldiscussion with your physicianabout your concerns? Get educatedand partner with your doctor. Thisis especially important since ourhealthcare system makes it difficultfor physicians to spend as muchtime with patients as they wouldlike, especially when it comes toprevention. And most insurersdon’t cover prevention services. Formany patients with diabetes, paying“out of pocket” for an individualcounseling session with a certifieddiabetes educator is worth everypenny.


Do You Have the Metabolic Syndrome?

Agree or disagree with the followingstatements to determine if you mighthave the metabolic syndrome:

1. My waist is greater than 40 inches (men) or 35 inches (women).
Yes No

2. My triglycerides are 150 mg/dl or more.
Yes No

3. My HDL cholesterol is 40 mg/dl or less (men) or 50 mg/dl or less (women).
Yes No

4. My blood pressure is 130/85 or more.
Yes No

5. My fasting blood glucose is 110 mg/dl or more.
Yes No

If you answered “yes” to three or morequestions, you may well have the metabolic syndrome.

Since the key to prevention is earlyidentification of people at risk, youranswers to the above questions cangive your doctor a better picture of howintensively he or she must evaluate you.

Reprinted from “Atkins DiabetesRevolution” (William Morrow, 2004)


How many risk factors forType 2 diabetes do you have?

I am overweight.
Yes No

I have excess weight around my waist.
Yes No

My diet is high in carbohydrates such asbread, potatoes and pasta.
Yes No

I eat starchy snack foods/sweets every day.
Yes No

I exercise fewer than three hours a week.
Yes No

I am African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, Native American, or Pacific Islander.
Yes No

My mother, father, sister, or brotherhas/had diabetes.
Yes No

I had gestational diabetes.
Yes No

My blood sugar is high.
Yes No

My blood pressure is high.
Yes No

I have high triglycerides.
Yes No

I am over age 45.
Yes No

Count up your yes answers. The moreyes answers you have, the greater thelikelihood you will get diabetes—orthat you have it already. If you havemore than five yes answers, discussyour risk with your doctor as soon aspossible.

Reprinted from Atkins DiabetesRevolution, William Morrow, 2004.

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