Divabetic is Bringing Sexy Back!

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Hundreds of women affected by diabetes across the country arefeeling great about themselves and learning to stay that way,thanks to an innovative diabetes outreach campaign presented by aworld leader in diabetes care, Novo Nordisk.┬áCalled “NovoNordisk Presents Divabetic—Makeover Your Diabetes,” theprogram combines personalized diabetes education with free salon andspa services in a crash course designed to help every woman’s“inner diva” take charge of her own and herfamily’s health.

The non-profit campaign, aimed at the 9 million women living withdiabetes, addresses the overwhelming low rate of successful diabetesmanagement in this country. Nearly 70 percent of Americans diagnosedwith diabetes are not managing it successfully. Divabetic takes amuch-needed new approach to education about the disease by taking itout of the clinical setting and into a fun and supportiveenvironment.

Divabetic is a colorful, glamorous, and entertaining night ofoutreach for diabetic women and their guests, staffed with plus-sizefashion experts, including Catherine Schuller, and diabeteseducators who motivate the participants to feel great aboutthemselves and improve how they and their loved ones live withdiabetes. During the three-hour evening event, women living withdiabetes are persuaded to share their success stories on stage as ameans of encouraging others to stay healthy and upbeat about theircare.

Following two well-received pilot events in 2006, the nationallaunch on February 22 in New York will kick off a 2007 tour ofDallas, New Orleans, Los Angeles, Cleveland, and Washington DC.Local certified diabetes educators and women affected by diabeteswho wish to participate are encouraged to visit www.ChangingDiabetes-us.com to pre-register. For information from Divabetics’ own Web site, please log on to www.divabetic.org. And if you’d like to find out even more about this excitingphenomenon before it sweeps into a city near you, go todiabeteshealth.com/tv for a lively video, “Novo Nordisk Presents Divabetic – Makeover Your Diabetes”.


Glam More, Fear Less—Savvy Safe Pedicures

Tips from Joy Pape, RN BSN CDE WOCN CFCN

Be more glamorous from head to toe. Yes, we’re talking toes.Taking care of diabetes includes taking care of your feet. Youdon’t need to worry about foot problems if you know what todo. Regular pedicures aren’t recommended for people withdiabetes, it’s true, because soaking, clipping, and possiblecontamination can cause problems. But safe pedicures that you doyourself, or with the help of your health care team and your salon,are just fine.

If you know the basics of foot care, you’ll know how toproperly manage your pedicures. Visit www.ChangingDiabetes-us.com to learn about special care for your feet. Meanwhile, follow theseguidelines.

Look at your feet every day

If you can’t see your feet, ask a loved one to look at themfor you, or look at their reflection in a long-handled orfull-length mirror. Looking at your feet every day ensures that youwill notice any change right away. Report changes to your healthcare team immediately.

Soften your skin

Wash your feet every day. Use a pumice stone (non-metal) gently onyour heels and hard dry areas daily. Use a moisturizer on your feetat least once a day, but not between your toes. Before going to bed,lather up with your lotion or cream and put on socks that fit.

Clip your own toenails, or have it done by your health careteam

Clip them straight across, not too short, and file the edges.Medicare and most insurance plans will pay for a podiatrist to clipyour nails.

Take care of your cuticles

Use cuticle oil on your cuticles rather than clipping them.You’ll be surprised at what a difference a little oil canmake. If you must, use an orange stick to gently push back yourcuticles.

Treat yourself to a polish

Pick out a delicious color and paint those tootsies! It’sperfectly all right for you to visit a salon and have your toespolished by a professional.

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