Men and Women with Diabetes Have Different Predictors of Mortality-Actual Cause of Death Unaffected by Gender

A recent Israeli study is showing that men and women with diabetes may need to watch out for very different things to find out if they are at increased risk of death.

The study followed 498 patients from three health care centers in Israel up until July of 1998, 233 of them men and 265 of them women. All subjects were questioned at the time of their enrollment to determine the length of their having diabetes, their blood pressure and whether or not they had any complications.

By the study’s end, 148 of the subjects had died, many of them with similar traits in their baseline interviews. For men, elevated albumin levels in the urine were associated with a significant increase in the risk of death, as were high triglyceride levels. These traits did not, however, correspond to an increased mortality rate in women, who saw their own relative risk of death increase in the presence of heart disease, serum creatinine levels and high GHb levels.

Although the study’s male and female subjects had very different predictors of death, there was little gender difference in actual cause of death.

The study concludes that the actual causes of death for men and women with diabetes are similar. However, each gender has a fairly unique set of predictors. Focusing on these predictors, the authors note, may have important implications in narrowing down appropriate treatments for diabetes by gender.

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