New Neuropathy Test Detects it Sooner

Millions of people with type 2 diabetes have never had their heart rate variability measured, despite the fact that heart rate variability can detect autonomic neuropathy.

According to published research, loss of heart rate variability in diabetic autonomic neuropathy is associated with up to a 50 percent mortality rate within five years of the onset of clinical symptoms. If detected soon enough, preventative measures can be taken to slow or even reverse this condition.

Boston Medical Technologies of Wakefield, Massachussets, is establishing a non-invasive heart rate variability test called the Anscore Health Management System. The system non-invasively tests how a patient’s heart responds to paced respiration and other controlled exercises.

Patients who undergo an Anscore Health Management System heart rate variability test wear three electrocardiograph leads and participate in a brief series of controlled exercises, which include:

  • Metronomic breathing test, in which an indicator guides patient breathing at a paced constant rate for 60 seconds
  • Valsalva test, in which patients blow forcibly until a series of monitor lights synchronize, and then hold that level of force for 15 seconds
  • Stand test, which measures heart rate as a patient moves from a supine to a standing position

The test generates a reproducible and quantifiable assessment and can easily be incorporated into a routine physical exam. Patients are able to receive a complete analysis in less than 15 minutes.

“Our technology brings both unsurpassed accuracy to this testing and ease-of-integration into a routine office visit,” says John Schafer, president and CEO of Boston Medical Technologies.

The Anscore System is being introduced nationwide in several hospitals and private practices, such as Chesapeake General Hospital in Norfolk, Virginia and Trinitas Hospital in Elizabeth, New Jersey.

For more information, call (781) 684-0770

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