Post Workout Stretches for More Flexibility

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By: Kiley Schoenfelder

It’s just as important to stretch after working out as stretching before a workout to keep you limber and flexible. And it feels great! Here are some of my favorite post-workout static (non-active) stretches for your whole body:

1. Hip Flexor/Quad. Using a soft surface kneel on one knee in front of a wall. Place your back foot up on the wall enough to get a good stretch through the front of that leg. Place your hands behind your head and maintain good posture. Hold each side at least 30 seconds for all static stretches.

2.  Glute/IT Band. From a seated position cross one foot over the opposite quad. Gently press the knee while holding the opposite foot in place with the other hand. Maintain good posture.

3. Hamstring. Lay on your back. Using a towel as a prop hold on to each end with your hands and wrap the middle of the towel around one foot. Guide that leg up straight aiming the bottom of the foot towards the ceiling. Keep the bottom leg straight and planted into the floor at all times.

4. Calf. Place one foot against a wall. Press both hands into the wall. Step back with one foot to feel a stretch through the back of the lower leg. The front leg should remain bent and the back heel should remain attached to the floor at all times. Slightly bend the back knee to get a deeper stretch if needed.

5. Chest. Press your lower arm against the opening of a doorway. Step the rest of your body just a few inches ahead of your arm so you feel a stretch through the chest/arm

For more inspiration, visit Kiley’s website at www.kfitnyc.com. Kiley is a fitness trainer and aerobic instructor in New York City. She has had type 1 diabetes since she was nine years old and she is feeling better than ever now at 37. Kiley and fellow fitness expert trainer, Crystal Stein, are in the photo demos.

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